Unplug seeds

The Best Way to Cut a Cantaloupe and Remove the Seeds

Don’t put one of the sweetest pleasures of summer in the hands of the produce department by purchasing pre-cut chunks of melon. Instead, learn how to cut a cantaloupe at home—after all, the tastiest melon is one that you cut yourself. Enjoying slices or cubes of that bright orange fragrant flesh starts with picking out the best, ripest melon and then putting in a small amount of knife work to get it from melon to slice.

There is no one right way to cut a cantaloupe, but we’re sharing a handy technique that offers a few different options, a choose-your-own cantaloupe adventure of sorts. And in case you were wondering, this cutting method also applies to honeydew, watermelon, or pretty much any melon, so it’s well worth learning.

Buying and Storing

Look for a melon with prominent webbing, a paler, slightly flattened side, and no attached stem. These are signs that the cantaloupe was allowed to fully ripen before being harvested, thus ensuring the deepest flavor. Then, take a whiff: A ripe melon will be intensely fragrant. It should be firm, not rock hard, and feel heavy for its size. Cantaloupes, like other melons, are perishable so keep yours in a cool, dry place. If it begins to soften or develop sunken areas, move it to the refrigerator and use within a day or two. If cut, cover, and refrigerate the melon in an airtight container for up to four days.

How to Cut

First, before slicing, make sure to clean the melon to prevent any bacteria on the skin from being transferred into the flesh. Then, get to work. Place the cantaloupe on your work surface and slice off the bottom and top ends, creating a flat surface on both sides which exposes the flesh. Discard the ends. Then rotate the cantaloupe so that it is standing up on one of the two flat ends, which keeps the melon sturdy on the work surface, creating an easier and safer cutting experience.

Next up, get ready to choose; you can either remove the skin first or proceed with cutting the cantaloupe with the skin on and remove it later.

Remove the Skin and Slice

Using your knife, slice off the outer skin of the melon revealing the flesh while following the shape of the sphere. Discard the skin. Slice the exposed melon in half either lengthwise or crosswise and use a spoon to scoop the seeds from the center, discard the seeds. From there you can thinly slice the melon crosswise or lengthwise, slice it into wedges, or cut the melon into chunks and enjoy!

Or Slice First, Then Remove the Skin

Rather than removing the skin to start, some people find it easier to keep it on for now. In this variation on how to cut a cantaloupe, cut the melon in half crosswise or lengthwise and use a spoon to scoop the seeds from the center, just like in the prior method, except the skin is still on the melon. Discard the seeds. If you are preparing melon balls, go ahead and use a melon baller or teaspoon to remove the flesh until you hit the skin.

For pieces, proceed cutting as follows: Slice the skin-on melon halves into wedges by halving one piece, then quartering each half, and so on until you reach desired wedge size. Enjoy as is with the skin on or place a wedge skin side down on the work surface and use a knife to slice along the skin, following the shape of the sphere removing the skin. Discard the skin. From here, the melon pieces can be enjoyed in wedges or cut into chunks or any shape you like.

How to Remove Seeds From a Melon

Save time, mess and waste in the kitchen with a gadget that’s much more versatile than its name implies.

Fresh cantaloupe is a favorite summertime fruit, but removing the seeds can be a mess. It turns out an ice scream scoop isn’t just for ice cream! It also makes quick work of seeding cantaloupe as well as honeydew. In just one swoop you can remove all of the seeds from a melon quickly and cleanly. It works much better than a spoon and saves time and mess.

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Unplug seeds

You can create application containers and application seeds in several different ways. You can also remove application containers from a CDB, and you can remove application seeds from application containers.

This section contains the following topics:


    You can create application containers in several different ways, including using the PDB seed, cloning an existing PDB or non-CDB, and plugging in an unplugged PDB. You can also remove application containers from a CDB.
    You can create application seeds in several different ways, including using the PDB seed, cloning an existing PDB or non-CDB, and plugging in an unplugged PDB. You can also remove application seeds from application containers.
    You create an application PDB by running the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement with an application root as the current container.

Creating and Removing Application Containers

You can create application containers in several different ways, including using the PDB seed, cloning an existing PDB or non-CDB, and plugging in an unplugged PDB. You can also remove application containers from a CDB.

This section contains the following topics:


    You can use the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement to create an application container in a CDB.
    You can unplug an application container from a CDB.
    You can drop an application container when you want to move the application container from one CDB to another or when you no longer need the application container.
Creating Application Containers

You can use the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement to create an application container in a CDB.

This section contains the following topics:


    The CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE . AS APPLICATION CONTAINER statement creates a new application container.
    Prerequisites must be met before creating an application container.
    You can create an application container using the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement with the AS APPLICATION CONTAINER clause.
About Creating an Application Container

The CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE . AS APPLICATION CONTAINER statement creates a new application container.

An application container consists of an application root and a collection of application PDBs that store data for one or more applications. The application PDBs are plugged into the application root, and you can optionally create an application seed for quick and easy creation of new application PDBs. The application PDBs and application root can share application common objects.

There are three types of application common objects:

Metadata-linked application common objects store the metadata for specific objects, such as tables, so that the containers that share the application common object have the same structure but different data.

Data-linked application common objects are defined once in the application root and shared as read-only objects in the context of hosted application PDBs.

Extended data-linked application common objects store shared data in the application root but also allow application PDBs to store data appended to that object. The appended data is local data that is unique to each application PDB.

You create an application container by including the AS APPLICATION CONTAINER clause in the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement. You can use the following techniques to create an application container:

Using the PDB seed

Cloning an existing PDB or non-CDB

Relocating a PDB

Plugging in an unplugged PDB

To create an application container, the current container must be the CDB root and you must specify the AS APPLICATION CONTAINER clause in the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement. You must create the application container using Oracle Managed Files.

An application container cannot be unplugged or dropped if any application PDBs belong to it.

Migrating Existing Applications to an Application Container

You can migrate an application to an application root by creating an application root using an existing PDB. You must complete additional tasks when you are migrating an existing application to an application container. The PDBs that you plug in must contain the application objects, including their data, and you must run procedures in the DBMS_PDB package to specify which objects are shared. Also, when application common users, roles, or profiles exist in the application root, you must run procedures in the DBMS_PDB package to specify that they are common.

After the application is migrated to the application root, you can create application PDBs in the application root, and create application PDBs using existing PDBs.

Preparing for Application Containers

Prerequisites must be met before creating an application container.

The CDB must exist.

The CDB must be in read/write mode.

The current user must be a common user whose current container is the CDB root.

The current user must have the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE system privilege.

You must decide on a unique application container name for every application container. Every application container name must be unique with respect to all containers in a single CDB, and every application container name must be unique within the scope of all the CDBs whose database instances are reached through a specific listener.

The application container name is used to distinguish an application container from other containers in the CDB. Application container names follow the same rules as service names, which includes being case-insensitive.

You must create the containing using Oracle Managed Files.

If you are creating an application container in an Oracle Data Guard configuration with a physical standby database, then additional tasks must be completed before creating an application container.

If you are migrating an existing application to an application container using installation scripts, then the scripts must be available to run.

If you are migrating an existing application to an application container using a PDB, then it must be possible to clone the PDB to the application root or plug in the PDB into the application root.

Creating an Application Container

You can create an application container using the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement with the AS APPLICATION CONTAINER clause.

Before creating an application container, complete the prerequisites described in “Preparing for Application Containers” .

  1. In SQL*Plus, ensure that the current container is the CDB root.
  2. Run the CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement, and include the AS APPLICATION CONTAINER clause. Specify other clauses when they are required.

After you create the application container, it is in mounted mode, and its status is NEW . You can view the open mode of an application container by querying the OPEN_MODE column in the V$PDBS view. You can view the status of an application container by querying the STATUS column of the CDB_PDBS or DBA_PDBS view.

A new default service is created for the application container. The service has the same name as the application container and can be used to access the application container. Oracle Net Services must be configured properly for clients to access this service.

You must open the new application container in read/write mode for Oracle Database to complete the integration of the new application container into the CDB. An error is returned if you attempt to open the application container in read-only mode. After the application container is opened in read/write mode, its status is NORMAL .

If an error is returned during application container creation, then the application container being created might be in an UNUSABLE state. You can check an application container’s state by querying the CDB_PDBS or DBA_PDBS view, and you can learn more about application container creation errors by checking the alert log. An unusable application container can only be dropped, and it must be dropped before an application container or PDB with the same name as the unusable application container can be created.

The application container is created with an application root. You can create application PDBs in the application container.

Example 12-1 Creating an Application Container Using the PDB seed

This example assumes the following factors:

Storage limits are not required for the application container. Therefore, the STORAGE clause is not required.

The application container does not require a default tablespace.

The PATH_PREFIX clause is not required.

The FILE_NAME_CONVERT clause and the CREATE_FILE_DEST clause are not required.

Either Oracle Managed Files is enabled for the CDB, or the PDB_FILE_NAME_CONVERT initialization parameter is set. The files associated with the PDB seed will be copied to a new location based on the Oracle Managed Files configuration or the initialization parameter setting.

There is no file with the same name as the new temp file that will be created in the target location. Therefore, the TEMPFILE REUSE clause is not required.

No predefined Oracle roles need to be granted to the PDB_DBA role.

The following statement creates the application container from the PDB seed:

Example 12-2 Creating an Application Container by Cloning a Local PDB

This example assumes the following factors:

The PATH_PREFIX clause is not required.

The FILE_NAME_CONVERT clause is required to specify the target locations of the copied files. In this example, the files are copied from /disk1/oracle/pdb1/ to /disk2/oracle/hract/ .

The CREATE_FILE_DEST clause is not used, and neither Oracle Managed Files nor the PDB_FILE_NAME_CONVERT initialization parameter is used to specify the target locations of the copied files.

To view the location of the data files for a PDB, run the query in “Example 19-7” .

Storage limits must be enforced for the application root. Therefore, the STORAGE clause is required. Specifically, all tablespaces that belong to the application root must not exceed 2 gigabytes. This storage limit does not apply to the application PDBs that are plugged into the application root.

There is no file with the same name as the new temp file that will be created in the target location. Therefore, the TEMPFILE REUSE clause is not required.

Given the preceding factors, the following statement clones hract as an application container from pdb1 :

If you are migrating an existing application to the new application container, then follow the instructions in “Migrating an Existing Application to an Application Container” .

Example 12-3 Creating an Application Container by Plugging In an Unplugged PDB

This example assumes the following factors:

The new application container is not based on the same unplugged PDB that was used to create an existing PDB or application container in the CDB. Therefore, the AS CLONE clause is not required.

The PATH_PREFIX clause is not required.

The XML file does not accurately describe the current locations of the files. Therefore, the SOURCE_FILE_NAME_CONVERT clause or SOURCE_FILE_DIRECTORY clause is required. In this example, the XML file indicates that the files are in /disk1/oracle/payroll/, but the files are in /disk2/oracle/payroll/, and the SOURCE_FILE_NAME_CONVERT clause is used.

The files are in the correct location. Therefore, NOCOPY is included.

Storage limits must be enforced for the application container. Therefore, the STORAGE clause is required. Specifically, all tablespaces that belong to the application container must not exceed 2 gigabytes.

A file with the same name as the temp file specified in the XML file exists in the target location. Therefore, the TEMPFILE REUSE clause is required.

The following statement plugs in the PDB:

If you are migrating an existing application to the new application container, then follow the instructions in “Migrating an Existing Application to an Application Container” .

Related Topics

Unplugging an Application Container from a CDB

You can unplug an application container from a CDB.

This section contains the following topics:


    Unplugging an application container disassociates the application container from a CDB.
    Unplug an application container by using an ALTER PLUGGABLE DATABASE . UNPLUG INTO statement.
About Unplugging an Application Container

Unplugging an application container disassociates the application container from a CDB.

Typically, you unplug an application container when you want to move the application container to a different CDB. Also, you can unplug the application container when you no longer want it to be available.

Unplugging an application container is similar to unplugging a PDB. To unplug an application container, connect to its CDB root and use the ALTER PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement to specify an XML file or a .pdb file. When you specify an XML file ( .xml extension), it will contain metadata about the application container after it is unplugged. The SQL statement creates the XML file, and it contains the required information to enable a CREATE PLUGGABLE DATABASE statement on a target CDB to plug in the application container. When you specify a .pdb file, it contains a compressed archive of the XML file that describes the application container and the files used by the application container (such as the data files and wallet file). A .pdb file enables you to copy a single, compressed file (instead of multiple files) to a new location to plug the application container into a CDB.

Before it can be unplugged, the application container must not have any application PDBs plugged into it, and it must be closed. When you unplug an application container, the unplugged application container is in mounted mode. The unplug operation makes some changes in the application container’s data files to record, for example, that the application container was successfully unplugged. Because it is still part of the CDB, the unplugged application container is included in an RMAN backup of the entire CDB. Such a backup provides a convenient way to archive the unplugged application container in case it is needed in the future.

To completely remove the application container from the CDB, you can drop it. The only operation supported on an unplugged application container is dropping the application container. The application container must be dropped from the CDB before it can be plugged back into the same CDB. An application container is usable only when it is plugged into a CDB.

“Modifying a PDB at the System Level” for information about initialization parameters and unplugged PDBs

Oracle Database Security Guide for information about common users and local users