Starting weed seeds outdoors

How to grow weed outdoors: an intro to outdoor cannabis cultivation

Outdoor cultivators take what Mother Nature gives them and turn it into the best possible harvest. Many cannabis consumers prefer marijuana grown outdoors under the full spectrum of natural sunlight. That unique spectrum creates a greater variance of cannabinoids and terpenes than artificial lighting.

Cannabis has been cultivated outdoors for thousands of years, but before you go putting a seedling in the ground, it’s best to know how the process works and how to make the most of Mother Nature’s gifts. You should also have some idea of how to handle those unwanted gifts you’d rather return — pests and weeds.

How to grow marijuana outdoors

To grow cannabis outdoors, the bare minimum required is basic gardening tools, soil, water, and a spot in your backyard that receives ample sunlight.

Using Mother Nature to cultivate cannabis

Cannabis is a hardy plant that has adapted to climates all over the world. From the cool and arid mountains of Afghanistan to the humid regions of Colombia, over time the plant has been forced to adapt its defenses against a host of problems. But cannabis is still susceptible to extreme weather conditions. Whether it is heavy winds breaking branches or excessive rain causing mold, the great outdoors presents challenges to growers that can be mitigated with sufficient planning.

Becoming intimately familiar with your local climate and seasons is one of the most important steps in producing high-quality outdoor marijuana. Before you grow, you’ll need to know the ideal temperature your plants require in order to thrive, the best site, optimal timing of planting and harvesting, and the season’s photoperiod — the amount and intensity of light available through the duration of the growing season.

Some cannabis genetics have adapted to specific climates and are capable of growing more easily in certain conditions than others, so pay very close attention to the cultivars, or strains, that you choose. A little research will go a long way in ensuring you have a successful harvest.

While cultivars may vary, here are some general rules that will be useful no matter which one you choose.

Temperature

Daytime temperatures between 75 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit (23.9 to 25.4 degrees Celsius) are ideal for cannabis, while temperatures above 88 degrees Fahrenheit (31.1 degrees Celsius) or below 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15.6 degrees Celsius) can delay growth. Cannabis is considered heat-tolerant, but sustained highs and extreme lows will usually lead to complications that could eventually kill your plants.

Season

In the Northern Hemisphere, cannabis can be planted in early to mid-spring and harvested in mid-fall, depending on the cultivar. In the Southern Hemisphere, the growing season will be reversed with planting in early to mid-fall and harvesting in the middle of spring.

Light

During the first half of the season, the daytime period increases until the summer solstice, which occurs in the Northern Hemisphere on or around June 21 and in the Southern Hemisphere on or around December 21. While the daylight hours increase, the plant’s vegetative stage takes place. During vegetation, the plant will develop the roots and stems that will serve as the foundation for growth until flowering.

After the solstice, the available daylight hours decrease, allowing the plant to naturally transition into the flowering period. Cannabis is a short-day plant, meaning it will begin to flower as the nights get longer and the hours of sunlight decrease.

Most cultivars will begin to flower once they receive fewer than 15 hours of sunlight per day. The latitude of your garden has a direct impact on how many hours a day your plants receive light.

Plan to put plants in the ground based on the temperature, season, and light where you live so your cannabis plants have time to finish flowering before cold, rainy weather sets in.

Choosing the best site for outdoor cannabis

Determining the optimum location is another important factor that can affect the yield and quality of your plants. Cultivators in the Northern Hemisphere should attempt to place their plants in an area with southern exposure to ensure their plants are getting the most available sunlight. The opposite is true for the Southern Hemisphere.

When possible, use natural structures and formations in your garden as windbreaks to prevent excessive stress on your plants that could lead to branches breaking.

If you live in a climate with exceptionally hot and sunny days, use shade cloth to prevent your plants from overheating. In cold areas, natural enclosures and cement or brick walls can be used to help retain any available heat and keep your plants warm.

Depending on your location, you may need to plan for rain. In most regions, the rainy season is typically aligned with the end of the flowering stage and the start of the harvesting period, but this may not always be the case. Rain can be detrimental to an outdoor flowering crop so being prepared to cover or move plants can help ensure a successful harvest. If it does rain on your plants, make sure to immediately shake off any excess water, as lingering moisture can lead to the formation of mold and nobody likes moldy weed.

Planning your garden

Seeds vs. clones

Deciding whether to start with seeds or clones will change the timing and manner by which your plants are introduced to the outdoors.

Plants grown from seeds are typically heartier and more vigorous than clones, as they produce a sturdier taproot that clones are not able to replicate. The vigor that comes from deep roots can be an advantage when dealing with harsh environmental conditions and pest pressures. The disadvantages of growing seeds are the additional attention required to germinate the seeds, the necessity to eliminate any males before they pollinate the females, and the high variability in growth characteristics that results from their genes.

Plants grown from seeds are typically heartier and more vigorous than clones, as they produce a sturdier taproot that clones are not able to replicate. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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If you decide to use seeds, make sure you start them about a month before you would typically start clones to give them time to germinate and adequately develop their taproot.

There are also many advantages and disadvantages of using clones. They can often be found at your local dispensary, are from a proven genetic lineage, and typically do well outdoors, making them the perfect choice for inexperienced growers. On the other hand, clones develop a fibrous root system, as opposed to the deep taproots that seeds develop. Fibrous root systems can reduce the plant’s ability to deal with environmental stress and predatory insects.

Whether using seeds or clones, many cultivators start growing their plants indoors to ensure they are not exposed to damaging weather conditions as they develop their initial root system. The plants can be transitioned outdoors when the weather and light conditions are ideal. Extending the indoor vegetative growth period can help increase yields and allow growers time to select the best plants to be moved outdoors.

Soil

Quality soil should be dark, rich in nutrients, and have a light and fluffy texture. The structure of your soil should be capable of retaining water but also allow for drainage of any excess. Organic potting soil blends from your local garden center will do just fine, but more advanced growers prefer to blend their own organic super soil from scratch. The soil itself should be slightly acidic with a pH of around 6. This can be tested with a soil pH meter or test kit.

Container gardens can be convenient as they can be moved around the garden to maximize sunlight or protect them from harsh conditions Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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Containers vs. in-ground

Container gardens can be convenient as plants can be moved around the garden to maximize sunlight or protect them from harsh conditions such as rain, heavy winds, or extreme temperatures.

Avoid clay pots as they can be costly, heavy, and retain heat that could dry out the plant’s soil and roots. Fabric pots are the least expensive and most effective solution, as they allow for ample drainage and plenty of oxygen to get to the roots. Plastic containers are also light and inexpensive but tend to retain more heat than fabric pots. Flowering plants need a container that is at least 5 gallons (18.9 liters) to prevent them from outgrowing their containers and becoming rootbound.

Planting directly into the ground or a raised bed requires a bit more preparation but has its benefits as well. Without a container to restrict growth, roots can grow deep and thick to support a strong plant. The added surface area also allows the plant to access a greater quantity of nutrients and water in the soil, compared with a container garden. The major downside is that the plants cannot be moved and could require additional structures to protect them in the case of extreme weather.

Nutrients

Cannabis requires more nutrients than many of the other plants you may have in your garden. Quality soil contains enough organic nutrients to start the growth cycle, but as your cannabis plant grows and transitions into flowering, it may deplete the available nutrients and require additional fertilizers.

The three primary nutrients required for cultivating marijuana are nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

During the vegetative phase, plants need more nitrogen in order to create the roots and leaves that serve as the base for flowering. During the start of the flowering cycle, the plants will require more phosphorus and potassium than nitrogen. Towards the end of the flowering cycle, once the majority of the nitrogen has been depleted, the plants will focus their attention on using the remaining nutrients. The lack of nitrogen is largely responsible for the vibrant purple and orange hues that can be seen on large fan leaves and throughout the plants’ colas.

Avoid all-in-one fertilizers as they can be too high in nitrogen for the flowering cycle and damage any beneficial microorganisms that may be present in the soil. Instead, choose a line of nutrients created specifically for cannabis, and use its suggested feeding charts to avoid over- or under-feeding. Organic sources of nutrients are best, as they are a great source of beneficial microbes, but they may take longer to break down and become available to the plant. Both types of nutrients can be found in dry, pre-blended powders or liquid emulsions, but can also be made from scratch with the right ingredients. Organic compost tea, which includes nutrient-rich ingredients, like molasses and earthworm casting compost, is a popular homemade brew for cannabis farmers.

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Organic sources of nutrients include alfalfa meal, bone meal, kelp meal, bat guano, fish emulsion, dolomite, and earthworm castings. Each contains different ratios of nutrients that can be used for different phases of the plants’ growth cycle.

Water

The amount of water a plant needs largely depends on its size, the size of its container, the soil type, and general environmental conditions such as the weather and the intensity of the sun. Larger plants in warmer environments tend to use more water than smaller plants in cooler weather. The amount of water needed will change throughout a plant’s life cycle.

During the vegetative stage, water your plants thoroughly, then not again until the top 1 inch (2.54 centimeters) of soil has dried out. This can be every day or every four days, depending on conditions, but the time between watering will become shorter as the plant grows its roots. Container gardens tend to dry out faster than soil beds, so they’ll need to be watered more frequently.

Wilting plants and dry soil are a direct sign that plants need water. Droopy leaves along with wet soil are a sign of overwatering. Both are common mistakes and can be avoided with some practice.

For a small garden, hand-watering is the easiest, cheapest way to go. It also allows you to get familiar with each cultivar’s needs, and gives each plant the exact amount of water it requires. Irrigation systems can be convenient for a large number of plants or for times when you cannot be in your garden.

Pest and weed control

Pests and wild plants are an inevitable occurrence when cultivating cannabis outdoors. Most issues can be avoided with proper planning. Clearing a buffer area around your plants can go a long way, but your first line of defense is a healthy plant that can defend itself naturally.

Pests come in many forms, from large deer and gophers to small slugs and spider mites. Larger animals and pets can be kept out of the garden with fencing, while gopher wire beneath your soil beds can keep rats and gophers from eating the plants’ roots. Weeds will not damage cannabis, but they will compete for the nutrients in the soil and reduce the quality and yield of your crops. A light layer of mulch on top of your soil can prevent weeds from sprouting in the middle of your plants’ cycle.

Avoid spraying synthetic insecticides on your cannabis plants as further research is needed to determine the health effects of smoking plants treated with synthetic chemicals. Organic pesticide and insecticide solutions can be effective if used properly. If you can avoid it, it is always best to not spray anything on your plants while they are flowering.

Beneficial insects, fungi, and bacteria can also be used to protect your plants from their parasitic or predatory counterparts. Jumping spiders, ladybugs, and other native, beneficial predatory insects can clear your crop of insects such as aphids and whiteflies. When sourcing beneficial insects, fungi, or bacteria, it’s important to research those which are native to your region.

Security

Even if it is legal to grow cannabis outdoors where you live, you should still take some precautions to hide the plants from public view. And it’s often required by law. You can grow your cannabis plants among other plants in your garden to hide them in plain sight. Cannabis can easily grow taller than your average fence, though. Training techniques can help keep your plants shorter. The fewer people who know you are growing cannabis, the better. The ideal situation is to have your grow tucked away on a piece of land where your plants can truly flourish away from prying eyes and nosy neighbors.

Greenhouse basics

Greenhouses can be a great middle ground between the complexities of an indoor setup and the uncertainty of growing outdoors. They provide ample protection from the elements and use far fewer resources than an indoor grow. Greenhouses can be more costly than an outdoor garden and require more planning, but they also allow you to extend the growing season considerably.

Greenhouses also offer growers the ability to harvest more than once per year, if they are equipped with a light deprivation system. These systems allow growers to control the hours of sunlight their plants receive, much like turning lights on and off in an indoor garden, by covering the greenhouse with a black tarp that deprives the plants of sunlight.

Greenhouse structures range from inexpensive polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, often called “hoop houses,” to highly engineered, fully automated, and purpose-built steel greenhouses. Due to their efficiency, greenhouses are quickly becoming the preferred growing method for many large-scale cultivators.

Final thoughts on successfully growing cannabis outdoors

Keep this info in mind as you embark on your cannabis-growing adventure. The smallest adjustments can make all the difference — planting a week earlier, a week later, watering less, watering more, etc.

Quality soil is crucial to the success of your crop and one of the few factors that you have control over when growing outdoors.

Timing is key. A short vegetative phase can cause cannabis plants to flower early, while a long vegetative phase can prevent your plants from finishing their flowering cycle if the weather takes a turn for the worse. The Farmer’s Almanac is a reliable source for planning around the seasons and preparing your crop for success.

Practice makes perfect, so always keep a grow journal and make sure to record any mistakes and wins along the way. Maintaining a record can help ensure you will have successful future harvests.

How to grow marijuana outdoors

Growing marijuana outdoors is great because you won’t need to spend a ton of money on it and you can rely on the power of the sun. If you have access to a sunny spot in a private yard or even a balcony, terrace, or rooftop, you can grow weed outside. You will be tied to the sun and the seasons and local weather, but you won’t have to spend a bunch of money on equipment and utilities like indoor growers.

If you’re growing weed outdoors, it’s great to find a community of cannabis growers in your area to see how others are growing in your specific climate. Local climates vary, so it can be helpful to see what strains thrive where you are, and also when other growers are popping seeds, harvesting, and more. You can also join online forums or Social media groups, but a great place to start is your local grow shop.

Benefits of growing weed outdoors

Low costs

Relying on the power of the sun, you won’t need to spend a ton of money on an outdoor grow. You’ll need some soil, fertilizer, seeds or clones, and maybe a small greenhouse to get them started. You won’t need to pay for electricity for lights, AC units, or dehumidifiers, and you can even collect rainwater.

Big yields

The sky’s the limit with outdoor plants—you can let them get as big and tall as you want, as long as they’re manageable. One plant can potentially yield between a half-pound and full-pound of dried weed! Growing a handful of hands for yourself is more than enough. With an indoor grow, your space is a lot more restricted.

Environmentally friendly

Indoor grows can be wasteful, using a ton of electricity to power all those lights, fans, and other equipment. The sun and the wind are free!

It’s fun and relaxing

Don’t underestimate the therapeutic value of gardening. It’s relaxing to spend some time outside, roll up your sleeves, and get your hands dirty for a while. And there’s nothing better than smoking something you grew yourself.

How to set up your outdoor marijuana grow

Here are some important considerations before starting an outdoor marijuana grow.

Climate in your area

It’s crucial to have a good understanding of the climate in the area you’re going to grow. Cannabis is highly adaptable to various conditions, but it is susceptible in extreme weather.

Sustained temperatures above 85°F will cause your plants to stop growing, while continued temperatures below 55°F can cause damage and stunting to plants, even death.

Heavy rains and high winds can cause physical damage to plants and reduce yields, and excessive moisture can lead to mold and powdery mildew, especially during the flowering stage.

Choosing the best outdoor cannabis grow site

Once you have an understanding of the climate in your area, you’ll need to consider a few things before planting your weed.

Sunlight

Weed plants will need full, direct sun for at least 6 hours a day. You may have a backyard, but it might not be great to grow there if it doesn’t get full sun every day.

Your cannabis plants should receive as much direct sunlight as possible, ideally during midday, when the quality of light is best. As the season changes and fall approaches, your plants will get less and less sunlight throughout the day, which will trigger the flowering stage.

Having a constant breeze is good for your plants, and especially in hot climates. But if you live in an area with a lot of high winds, consider planting near a windbreak of some sort, like a wall, fence or large shrubbery.

Privacy and security

You also want to consider privacy and security. A lot of people want to conceal their gardens from judgmental neighbors and potential thieves. Tall fences and large shrubs or trees are your best bet, unless you live in a secluded area. Also, most state laws require that you keep cannabis plants concealed from the street.

Types of outdoor grow spaces

Some growers plant in containers on balconies or rooftops that are shielded from view, while some build heavy-gauge wire cages to keep thieves and animals at bay. Whatever you decide, think about how big you want your final plant to be—outdoor cannabis plants can grow to 10 feet tall or even more, depending on how much you let them go.

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Garden plot: Probably the most common outdoor growing spot, many will plant cannabis alongside other growing veggies.

Balcony: This can be a great spot if it gets good light—ideally, it faces south—and will usually get good wind. However, you may need to cover your balcony from peeping neighbors.

Roof: This can be great for sun but may have too much wind.

Soil and other media for outdoor cannabis growing

Soil, at a basic level, is defined as the topmost layer of earth in which plants grow—it’s a mixture of organic remains, clay, and rock particles. Cannabis plants thrive in soil rich with organic matter, and they need good drainage.

Most outdoor weed growers will either dig a hole and add fresh soil for the plant, or grow their weed in pots. This will allow you to better control the growing medium and the amount of nutrients your plants receive.

You can plant directly into the ground, using the preexisting soil, but you’ll need to understand your soil’s composition and amend it accordingly. If you go this route, we recommend getting your soil tested, which will minimize headaches, and it’s easy and relatively inexpensive. A soil test will tell you the makeup and pH of your soil, any contaminants present, and will recommend materials and fertilizers to amend your soil.

Soil has three basic consistencies, in various ratios:

Soil also varies in:

  • pH level
  • Water retention
  • Texture
  • Nutrient makeup
  • Drainage

Silt soils

Silty soil is the ideal growing medium. It’s easy to work, warms quickly, holds moisture, has good drainage, and contains a lot of nutrients. The best silty soil is dark, crumbly loam—it’s fertile and probably won’t need any amending.

  • Medium granular size
  • Naturally fertile (contains nutrients)
  • Retains water
  • Stabilizes plants
  • Poor drainage
  • Easily compacted

Sandy soils

Sandy soil is easy to work, drains well, and warms quickly, but it doesn’t hold nutrients well, especially in rainy environments. You’ll want to dig large holes for your plants and add compost, peat moss, or coco coir, which will help bind the soil together.

In hot climates, sandy soil should be mulched to help with water retention and to keep roots from getting too hot.

  • Large granular size
  • Low pH
  • Good drainage
  • Prevents compaction
  • Easy to work with
  • High oxygen levels
  • Poor water retention
  • Dries out quickly
  • Nutrients get washed away

Clay soils

Heavy clay soils drain slowly and don’t hold oxygen well, so they will need to be heavily amended. A few weeks before you plant, dig large holes where you’ll be placing your weed plants and mix in big amounts of compost, manure, worm castings, or other decomposed organic matter. This will provide aeration and drainage, as well as nutrients for the plants.

  • Small granular size
  • High pH
  • Provides minerals
  • Retains water
  • Stabilizes plants
  • Poor drainage
  • Heavy soil
  • Hard to work

Loam soils

While some plants thrive in their native soils, which are usually one of the compositions listed above, cannabis plants are best grown in soil that includes a combination of the three consistencies above—this mixture is known as loam.

The best way to identify loamy soil is by touching it. How does it feel? Sandy soil should be difficult to compact while clay should compact into a tight ball that won’t crumble. When squeezed, loamy soils should form a loose ball that will hold its structure momentarily before breaking apart in large chunks.

  • Mixture of sand, silt, and clay
  • Near neutral pH
  • Drainage
  • Water retention
  • Naturally fertile
  • Easy to work
  • Nutrient retention
  • Supports microorganisms
  • High oxygen levels

Most potting soils used in gardening are loam soils. If you’ve ever worked with potting soil, you’ll know that its composition is rich and diverse, and it looks dark and hearty. Beyond texture and color, the soil should smell rich and alive.

Buying the right soil for an outdoor cannabis grow

For most first-time gardeners, we recommend buying a quality potting soil that will provide your plants with enough nutrients to get them through most of their growth cycle without having to add many amendments. This pre-fertilized soil—often referred to as “super-soil”—that can grow cannabis plants from start to finish without any added nutrients if used correctly.

You can make this yourself by combining worm castings, bat guano, and other components with a good soil and letting it sit for a few weeks, or it can be purchased pre-made from a local nursery or grow shop.

While shopping for soil, you might be overwhelmed by the options available at your local garden store. The soil type is the basic structure of your soil. From there, look at nutrients, microorganisms, and other amendments that improve the soil. Your choices will be flooded with words like:

  • Perlite
  • Worm castings
  • Bat guano
  • Biochar
  • Peat moss
  • Compost
  • Fish meal
  • Bone meal
  • Glacier rock dust
  • Plant food

These are just some examples of amendments commonly used in different types of soils. Heavily amended soils will have long lists that break down all organic nutrients they contain. Some companies create soils that offer a great structure with base nutrients, but allow you to fill in the gaps as you desire.

Growing containers

You may need to put all of your plants in containers if you don’t have great soil. Also, if you’re unable to perform the heavy labor needed to dig holes and amend soil, containers may be the only way for you to grow your own cannabis outdoors.

If you don’t have a suitable patch of earth to make a garden, containers can be placed on decks, patios, rooftops, and many other spots. If needed, you can move them around during the day to take advantage of the sun or to shield them from excessive heat or wind.

However, plants grown in pots, buckets, or barrels will likely be smaller than those planted in the ground because their root growth is restricted to the size of the container. In a broad sense, the size of the pot will determine the size of the plant, although it’s possible to grow large plants in small containers if proper techniques are used.

What size pot do I need?

In general, 5-gallon pots are a good size for small-to-medium outdoor plants, and 10-gallon pots or larger are recommended for big plants. Regardless of size, you’ll want to protect the roots of your plants from overheating during warm weather, as pots can quickly get hot in direct sunlight. This will severely limit the growth of your plants, so be sure to shade your containers when the sun is high in the sky.

Fertilizers and nutrients for outdoor soil

Cannabis plants require a large amount of nutrients over their life cycle, mainly in the form of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. How much you need to add to your plants will depend on the composition of your soil.

Typically, outdoor growers will add amendments to soil when weed plants are transplanted outside. Outdoor amendments usually come in powder form that you mix in with soil.

Start off with fertilizers that are inexpensive and readily available. Some release nutrients quickly and are easily used by the plant, while others take weeks or months to release usable nutrients. If done correctly, you can mix in a few of these products with your soil amendments to provide enough nutrients for the entire life of your plants. Most of these items can be purchased cheaply at your local nursery.

We recommend these organic fertilizers:

  • Blood meal or fish meal for nitrogen
  • Bone meal or bat guano for phosphorus
  • Wood ash or kelp meal for potassium
  • Dolomite lime for calcium and magnesium
  • Epsom salts for magnesium and sulfur

There are also commercially available soil blends that already contain the proper mix of these types of ingredients.

For first-time growers, we recommend avoiding commercial fertilizers like long-release granular fertilizers. These can be used, but you need to have a good understanding of how they work and what your plants need.

We also advise against using nutrients designed for indoor weed growing—they are generally composed of synthetic mineral salts and can damage soil bacteria.

Again, getting your soil tested can be very useful and will tell you how to amend your soil and what types and amounts of fertilizer to use. If you are unsure how much to use, be conservative, as you can always add nutrients to the top of soil—called “top dressing”—if plants start to show deficiencies.

Kickstart Your Outdoor Grow!

Each year, when February tips over into March, we see the first signs of spring emerging. That’s a breath of relief for us all after the grim realities of a harsh winter, but spring is especially heart-warming for cannabis growers! Now is the time to start planning new grow adventures, starting with picking the best cannabis seeds to work with. Of course, we are here to help you make the most of every last ray of sunlight once this year’s outdoor grow season kicks off!

The Outdoor Grow Season: Cannabis Gardening

No matter how fancy and high tech grow rooms or tents may be, most growers agree that nothing beats weed raised on the pure, raw power of nature itself. On top of that, cannabis as a species has evolved out in the open for millions of years. Obviously, every last shred of cannabis genetics is meant to thrive in its original habitat, which makes the case for growing weed outdoors perfectly clear. Less sun in the season? Choose an Autoflowering strain. Perfect climate? Feminized is the right choice. With prime genetics like Amsterdam Genetics cannabis seeds, anyone can prepare for a great kickoff to the outdoor grow season!

We’re all aching to catch a bit of a tan and soak up some much-needed vitamin D under the prevailing lockdown conditions. Gardening is a great way to do just that – including cannabis gardening, obviously. As the spring equinox approaches, it’s time to pick that perfect strain and start preparing to germinate and grow some plants!

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When Does The Outdoor Cannabis Grow Season Start?

Several factors determine the perfect timing for the start of the outdoor grow season. Geographic location matters, as spring doesn’t bring warmth and sunlight to all regions simultaneously, or in equal measure. Still, from a global perspective, the spring equinox is an important point on any grower’s calendar. The spring equinox officially marks the first day of spring; in the Northern Hemisphere at least. Every year, around March 20, the Sun crosses the equator parallel, promising more hours of daylight and warmer weather to come. For the southern half of the planet, the March equinox hails the start of autumn, as the annual seasonal cycle proceeds in the exact opposite direction.

The Outdoor Grow Season, Step By Step

Let’s see how you can best prepare for the oncoming grow season. If you know what to do and when to do it for perfect timing, you can spend all spring and summer dreaming of that glorious harvest time as you watch your grass grow. Here’s our month-by-month guide to the ultimate outdoor grow season!

Late February Through March: Planning For Planting

Picking An Outdoor Grow Location

By late February, as the first brave snowdrops and crocuses burst from the soil, it’s time to stock up on seeds and pick the cannabis genetics that best match your taste and grow goals. This is the time for planning ahead – don’t forget that the time for planting is drawing closer every day now…

It all starts with great seeds…

Try to decide on the best spot to plant or pot cannabis plants after germination. Our outdoor grow locations blog helps weigh all the relevant factors and pick the prime weed growing spot in any garden. Aim for the optimal combination of sunlight, shelter from bad weather, and a stealthy spot to avoid unwanted detection. Growers who have found found that sweet weed spot are good to go. Start by loosening up the soil and add some organic fertilizer to optimize your natural open-air grow medium. Read up on the best soil for growing weed here.

Find The Perfect Match In Outdoor Cannabis Seeds

Picking the right cannabis seeds is possibly the most important step on the road to the harvest of your dreams. There are many things to consider here. Are you looking for specific genetics, such as sativa seeds or indica-dominant strains? Are you growing for specific effects, or a favourite flavour? Perhaps you want to grow medicinal cannabis for stress relief, to combat depression, or to treat (chronic) pain issues? You’ll find all of this and more among the thirty-plus world-class strains in our online seeds catalogue.

Growing Weed In Warmer And Cooler Areas

In the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere, including Canada, US states up north and Northern Europe, summers tend to be rainier, cooler, and shorter than those in more southern regions. That is why southern growers can start germinating and pregrowing their seeds in March, planting them once the April sunshine comes. In northern areas, May is the best month to plant germinated seedlings outside. Growers could can decide to pregrow seedlings indoors as early as late February to give their weed a head start for when spring arrives.

The start of the outdoor season varies between regions.

Feminized, Autoflower, Or Regular Seeds?

Then there’s the choice between photoperiod seeds or autoflower strains that start flowering automatically. Regular seeds can grow into male or female plants, giving you extra options and flexibility, but feminized seeds maximize your grow efficiency by yielding 99% feminine plants with harvestable flower buds. That’s a lot of choices to make – better start picking the best feminized, regular, or autoflower seeds to order. Give the delivery guy or girl enough time to ship them over, because once you see the first signs of spring, April is just around the corner!

April: Germination And Pregrow Time

Come April, even northern outdoor growers can start growing seeds. As the days lengthen and the sun gains strength, this is a good moment to germinate your seeds. If you still haven’t decided, order your cannabis seeds now to make sure they arrive in time. Germination, as this blog explains, is the moment when a tiny weed seedling emerges from its protective seed shell. The first root and leaves peep out, ready for their first drink of water and touch of sunshine.

Germination: a special moment both indoors and outdoors.

Growers working in Mediterranean climates can start planting seedlings and pregrown cannabis plants outside in April. For the northern parts of the US, Canada, and Northern Europe, this is the time to start germinating the seeds you bought. Once they pop, put them in small flower pots in the window sill where they get lots of early sun. Another option is to set seedlings off in a (pregrow) tent under artificial lighting. That way, your young plants are stronger once you take them outside in May. Having a little greenhouse available makes it safer to plant outdoors in late April, but even then, the option to bring fragile sprouts back inside if a late frost spell hits is a safe bet.

May: Time To Plant Your Outdoor Cannabis Grow!

Yay – you’ve made it to May! This is when spring peaks all over the northern half of the world, ready to tip over into summer warmth. June and July are the most prolific growing months of the year, so planting young plants in May lets them make the most of the summer throughout the vegetative stage of their life cycle. By now, your pregrow should be past its infancy, with the first real branches and characteristic weed plant leaves starting to shoot upwards to the heavens. If you haven’t germinated your seeds yet, you’ll want to do so now, preferably planting them outside as soon as they pop without further delay.

Useful Tips For Your Outdoor Grow Season

If you’re not sure which seeds to pick for this year’s outdoor grow season, we have a few suggestions to help you on your way.

Outdoor Indicas & Indica Dominant Strains

Our seeds catalogue indicates the average flowering times of every strain we have. As a rule of thumb, cannabis with more indica-dominant genetics tends to flower faster. They evolved in mountainous Asian regions where they had to flower quickly before the cold weather returned. That makes them great for northern climes and their shorter summers. Added benefit: indica strains tend to grow short and bushy, making them easier to hide and manage in gardens with limited space. Pineapple Kush is a good example of a heavily indica-leaning strain, as are Strawberry Glue and our sweet-tasting Chocolato. Broadly speaking, these same considerations also apply to hybrids with dominant indica genetics.

Strawberry Glue is a nice indica-heavy outdoor strain.

Outdoor Sativas & Sativa Dominant Strains

Sativa genetics evolved in warmer equatorial regions, enabling them to enjoy long, hot summers and loads of sunshine. That is why sativa strains tend to have longer flowering times than indicas, making them more suited for sunny, southern areas closer to the Mediterranean, or the southern coastal areas of the US. If you are growing weed up north and you’re after typical sativa highs and their cerebral, energizing head buzz effect, try finding a strain with a nice balance of indica and sativa genetics. Cannabis seeds such as White Choco, Tangerine G13, or Choco Cheesecake are good examples. Sativa genetics tend towards tall plant growth, which can make stealthy growing tricky. On the other hand, sativa strains usually feature open, airy bud structure. That can help prevent mold damage from culprits like bud rot or mildew. Indicas tend to have more compact buds that can prove risky during the cool, damp conditions associated with harvest time up north.

White Choco: legendary hybrid outdoor genetics.

Autoflowers Make The Most Of The Cannabis Grow Season

Autoflower strains are a brand apart when it comes to outdoor growing. These plants carry cannabis ruderalis genetics in the mix, which enables them to start flowering at their own preferred time rather than waiting for the days to grow shorter around midsummer. If you play your cards right, planting autoflower strains early in the season (preferably pregrown indoors for a solid start outside), you could squeeze in two or even three grows into a single cannabis grow season. Depending on your location and the weather conditions, you could take autoflower plants outside in April (if there’s no chance of late frost).

Choco Kush Autoflower in full bloom.

Pick an autoflower with a very short flowering and grow phases and you should be able to harvest in late June or July. That gives you enough time to get another grow going before it gets too cold – even if you don’t have much space. Do keep in mind, though, that the speed at which the automated beauties develop limits your options to guide them or correct your mistakes. Try to pick a robust, rugged strain with high resistance to pests and fungi. Milkshake Kush Auto and the hugely popular White Choco Autoflower strain are our prime suggestions for your automated outdoor grows. Autoflowers are usually vulnerable to overfeeding, so go easy on the nutrients and keep them close for daily inspection.

Time To Start Picking Those Seeds!

As you can see, there’s plenty to consider before getting that fresh outdoor grow season started. Whichever approach fits your location, taste, and garden options best, now is the time to start shopping for seeds that will make the most out of your grow. The better you’re prepared, the more time you’ll have to soak up that spring and summer sunshine while your crops shoot up around you…

Better get that hammock ready – enjoy watching that grass grow!

You now know all you need to kickstart your outdoor grow season. Remember: summer is approaching fast… Grab those seeds and enjoy your outdoor grow season!