Juliet seeds

Juliet seeds

A grape-like tomato with red ripening fruits that are elongated and slightly pointed at the ends. Juliet is a 1990’s hybrid introduction that is now popular for its uniformly shaped fruits that have a pleasant sweet flavor. The fruits are also known for their crack-resistance and ability to remain on the vine much longer than average tomatoes. Fruits can be eaten directly out of hand and are popular in salads and dishes that call for cherry tomatoes. Vines are very prolific with dozens of fruits sometimes ripening daily during the main harvest season.

Seed Availability

Seeds are now available at our seed store.

Days to Maturity

Growth Habit

Origin

Hybrid, United States origin.

Germination Info

1) Prepare for planting. Sprout tomato seeds in small containers, preferably 4″ or smaller. In-ground germination is not recommended. Use a standard potting mix that is well drained. Start seeds in containers approximately 8 weeks prior to the planned set-out date. Plants should ultimately be transplanted to the garden 1-2 weeks after the expected date of last frost.

2) Plant seeds. Plant seeds 1/4″ deep in the soil. Cover with soil and water carefully. Overwatering can cause fungal growth which leads to seed rot. Excess water can also bury seeds deep in the soil where they will not be able break the surface. Water when the soil surface just begins to dry. Multiple seeds can be planted in a single starter container, but should be thinned once seedlings appear so only a single plant remains. Seeds do not require light for germination but some light source should be provided for seedlings once they emerge from the soil.

3) Germination. Soil should be kept consistently warm, from 70-85F. Cool soils, below about 60-65F, even just at night, will significantly delay or inhibit germination. Hot soils above 95F will also inhibit germination.

4) Care of seedlings. Once a few true leaves have developed, seedlings should be slowly moved outside (if sprouted indoors) to ambient light. Care should be taken not to expose seedlings to direct, scorching sun so plants may need to be hardened off via slow sun exposure. Hardening off can be done using a shaded or filtered light location, as well as protection from strong winds, rain or low humidity. Hardening off time varies, but can take 5-10 days.

5) Planting out. Plant in the ground once danger of frost has past and daytime temperatures consistently reach 65F. Plants can be spaced as close as 24″ apart.

Germination time: 1-3 weeks under ideal conditions.

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Juliet Small-Fruited Tomato

Culture: Usually started indoors Feb–April. Minimum germination soil temperature 50°, optimal range 60-85°. Transplant after frost danger has passed. Avoid using fresh manure as it causes lush foliage with few ripe fruits. Instead use generous amounts of well-rotted cow or horse manure or compost to boost plant vigor, and crushed eggshells or gypsum at the bottom of each hole for calcium. Heavy phosphorus needs. Respond well to foliar sprays.

  • Determinate (Det.) bush varieties may be staked, should not be pruned.
  • Indeterminate (Ind.) climbing varieties are customarily staked and pruned. Tomato experts Carolyn Male and Kokopelli’s Dominique Guillet both oppose pruning, arguing more abundant foliage provides more photosynthesis.

Good seed retains viability so we often commission two-year productions. Organically and sustainably grown seed was rinsed with a sodium hypochlorite solution to reduce risk of seed-borne disease. This treatment poses no health risks.

Saving Seed:: Saving tomato seed is easy! Remove stem-end and crush the fully ripe fruit into a container. Ferment uncovered for a few days until the slurry forms a moldy cap. Rinse in a fine strainer and dry seeds on a coffee filter. To ensure true-to-type seed, grow open-pollinated varieties and separate by 50 feet.

Diseases:

  • ASC: Alternaria Stem Canker
  • EB: Early Blight
  • F: Fusarium
  • GLS: Grey Leaf Spot
  • LB: Late Blight
  • N: Nematodes
  • SEPT: Septoria Leaf Spot
  • TSWV: Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus
  • TMV: Tobacco Mosaic Virus
  • V: Verticillium
Pests and Disease Remedies for Tomatoes

Early Blight shows up as drying and dying leaves at the bottom of the plant. EB can be managed culturally; should not result in significant crop loss. Mulching deters EB by reducing rain splash on foliage. Do not compost affected plants as EB can overwinter even on dead tissue.
Cultural controls: Rotation, avoid stressing plants, staking, minimize leaf wetness, mulching, indeterminate varieties are more resistant/tolerant, disinfect stakes & cages.
Material controls: Regalia, Cease.

Late Blight usually starts on the foliage of the plant. Early in the season, late blight infection shows as roundish lesions on leaves that uniquely will cross the center vein of the leaf. Later, blotches appear on stems. Still later, hard crusty lesions form on fruits. LB on tomatoes is not seed-borne and does not survive on dead tissue. Letting plants freeze on soil surface kills LB spores.
Cultural controls: Destroy cull potatoes & potato volunteers, avoid overhead irrigation.
Material controls: Regalia, Copper, Cease.

Septoria Leaf Spot can appear almost overnight. It is characterized by yellowing and small circular spots on older leaves. It can eventually spread to the entire plant in conditions of high humidity and temperatures. It can be spread by wind or carried on clothing and tools. Septoria can live over the winter on live tissue, so don’t compost affected plants.
Cultural controls: Space plants for good air circulation.
Material controls: Regalia, Copper, MilStop.

Anthracnose
Cultural controls: Rotation, mulching, minimize plant wetness, staking, use compost.
Material controls: MilStop, Copper, Regalia, Cease

Tomato Hornworm
Cultural controls: Look for frass (droppings) and handpick. Eeeuww! Use a blacklight to find them. See if you can get the chickens to eat them.
Material controls: Bacillus thuringiensis subsp.kurstaki, Monterey Garden Insect Spray, Entrust.

Tarnished Plant Bug
Cultural controls: Floating row covers, good weed control.

Bacterial Canker, Spec and Spot
Cultural controls: Disinfect greenhouse materials & cages, farming tools & gloves, avoid overhead irrigation, don’t work crop when wet, rotate crops, use compost.
Material controls: Copper.

Preventing Late Blight

  • Where possible, use resistant varieties. Our search continues for a resistant main crop variety that meets our high standards for flavor
  • Try to find tolerant cultivars—use anecdotal evidence and experiment.
  • Grow your own tomato plants or buy locally grown seedlings. Avoid big-box seedlings. Know your farmer!
  • Do not use saved potatoes as seed stock. Purchase only new certified disease-free seed potatoes. Click here for more potato-related late blight info.
  • Plant in areas with full sun and few wind blocks. Avoid shade and moist environments. Facilitate air movement. Maintain high soil fertility.
  • If you choose to spray, have a plan and materials on hand, so you can make quick and timely application(s) when conditions indicate. Order supplies from Organic Growers Supply
  • Most market growers and many home gardeners now grow at least a portion of their tomatoes in high tunnels, which greatly reduces vulnerability though still requires vigilance.
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Information Sources
  • See vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/ for excellent photos and info.
  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension: Potato IPM bi-weekly tells where LB infections have been confirmed in Maine or the eastern United States, umaine.edu/potatoes, 1-888-USE-UMCE.
  • Or use the forecast model uspest.org/risk/tom_pot_map to assess potential for spore germination and lesion formation in your area.

Preventing Late Blight

  • Where possible, use resistant varieties. Our search continues for a resistant main crop variety that meets our high standards for flavor
  • Try to find tolerant cultivars—use anecdotal evidence and experiment.
  • Grow your own tomato plants or buy locally grown seedlings. Avoid big-box seedlings. Know your farmer!
  • Do not use saved potatoes as seed stock. Purchase only new certified disease-free seed potatoes. Click here for more potato-related late blight info.
  • Plant in areas with full sun and few wind blocks. Avoid shade and moist environments. Facilitate air movement. Maintain high soil fertility.
  • If you choose to spray, have a plan and materials on hand, so you can make quick and timely application(s) when conditions indicate. Order supplies from Organic Growers Supply
  • Most market growers and many home gardeners now grow at least a portion of their tomatoes in high tunnels, which greatly reduces vulnerability though still requires vigilance.
Information Sources
  • See vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/ for excellent photos and info.
  • University of Maine Cooperative Extension: Potato IPM bi-weekly tells where LB infections have been confirmed in Maine or the eastern United States, umaine.edu/potatoes, 1-888-USE-UMCE.
  • Or use the forecast model uspest.org/risk/tom_pot_map to assess potential for spore germination and lesion formation in your area.

Germination Testing

For the latest results of our germination tests, please see the germination page.

Warehouse Hours
Tuesday–Thursday 9AM–3PM.
Organic Growers Supply: open for shopping and order pickup.
Fedco Seeds & Fedco Trees: closed to the public.
Directions to our Warehouses

The Juliet Tomato

The Juliet tomato is a grape tomato variety that’ sweet and delicious. It’s often nicknamed the “mini Roma” because of its shape. These tomatoes are soft and juicy like cherry tomatoes and enjoy a long shelf life. The plants have vigorous vines, known for setting abundant fruits. Plus, they are hearty plants resistant to many diseases and a great starter plant for amateur growers.

History of the Juliet Tomato

Juliet tomatoes are hybrids first introduced in the 1990s and are a larger sister variety to the Santa grape tomato.

Characteristics of the Juliet Tomato

Juliest are indeterminate hybrid grape tomatoes. They grow in 12-18 fruit clusters on the vine with good vine storage, crack resistance, and shelf life.

Ripening Season

This early season tomato takes about 60-70 days to produce fruit if transplanting outdoors from indoors, and 80-85 days if growing outdoors from seed. Also, they can continue to produce until the first frost.

Tomato Qualities

These tomatoes have a sweet flavor. They are firm with glossy red skin and an elongated shape.

Tomato Size

Juliet tomatoes grow to weigh up to an ounce each and are slightly larger than Santa grape tomatoes.

Planting Zones

These tomatoes can produce fruits in USDA zones 3-11. It’s recommended that you start your plant indoors and transplant it outdoors after eight weeks before the last frost of the spring. When transplanting, bury 2/3 of the plant but make sure exposed leaves do not touch the ground.

Size and Spacing

Juliet tomato plants can grow 6-8 feet tall. Plant spacing should be 18-36 inches apart.

Pollination

Unlike other types of tomatoes, hybrid seeds can not be saved year after year to produce new plants. You must purchase new seeds every year for the best results.

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Plant Care

The following sections will provide highlights about tomato care. For a complete guide on optimal tomato plant care, from planting to harvesting and storage, please check out our article on How To Grow Tomatoes: The Complete Guide For the Best Tomatoes.

A sturdy trellis or some heavy-duty stakes is definitely a must for this plant as it grows in climbing vines. Also, a good compost around the base will help your plant grow and produce more fruits. Here’s a great compost guide that can help. You also want to weed around your plants every day or so.

Sunlight

Tomatoes require between 6-10 hours of direct sunlight daily.

Well-drained soil that’s loose and nutrient-rich with a soil pH between 6.2 and 6.8 is ideal. Tomatoes can do well in most soil types. However, they struggle in clay soil. In this case, a grower would need to till their soil with loom or sandy loom before transplanting their Juliet tomato plants.

Water

Water regularly at least once a day, keeping the soil moist around the base of the plant. Never water on the plant itself. Increase watering to two times a day during scorching days.

Fertilizer

Tomatoes require specific nutrients (such as calcium) to produce their best crops of fruit. To learn how to determine what your tomatoes need and when they need it, consult our ultimate tomato fertilizer guide.

Pruning/Pinching

Most gardeners abstain from pinching or pruning the buds on their Juliet tomato plants since the new vines can easily accommodate large quantities of fruits if the plaint is sufficiently fertilized and watered. This can be very refreshing for tomato growers who pinch and prune their plants like crazy. Just feed and water your Juliets and let them do their thing!

Disease

Juliet tomatoes are hybrids designed to resist diseases and skin cracking. However, there are certain best practices to protect your plants from disease. To learn how to detect, treat, and take steps to prevent diseases, read our tomato diseases guide.

Pests

Regional pests such as snails, birds, grasshoppers, etc., can and usually will target your Juliet tomatoes. For information to help you spot, eliminate, and deter 15 different pests, visit our guide on common tomato pests.

When to Harvest Juliet Tomatoes

Juliet tomatoes plants are ready to harvest 60-70 days after transplanting them into your outdoor garden. And they will continue to grow and deliver more fruit throughout the season as they are indeterminate. Be prepared to harvest a lot of these delicious tomatoes!

Common Uses For Juliet Tomatoes

Juliet tomatoes are ideal for many dishes, especially those calling for grape tomatoes. However, they are larger than your average grape or cherry tomatoes and usually require being cut in half for many recipes.

What Does This Tomato Taste Like?

Juliets have a sweet, slightly acidic tomato-ey taste and are an All-America Selections winner.

Cooking

Juliet tomatoes are ideal for many cooked recipes; however, they are usually had or even quartered due to their size.

Eating raw

These tomatoes are fantastic in salads and on kabobs.

Canning

Canning tomatoes is a fairly simple process and a great way to preserve your harvest for using in the fall and winter. You can find complete instructions in this canning guide.

Freezing

Frozen tomatoes work very well for recipes such as soups and stews, but they do not retain their great taste and texture when eaten raw.

Drying

You can also sun-dry Juliet tomatoes for delicious seasoning used in many recipes. Here’s a great guide on how to do it.

Recipe Ideas

Health Benefits of Juliet Tomatoes

Tomatoes are bursting with flavor and nutrients such as folate vitamins C and K and potassium. Tomatoes are also among the best daily sources of a powerful antioxidant called lycopene, which researchers credit with reducing the risks of cancers and heart disease.

They are also a great source of fiber and are low in carbs.

Where to Buy Juliet Tomato Plants or Seeds

You can find Juliet tomato seeds at your local nurseries, grocery stores, and online retailers such as Amazon.