Hawaiian baby woodrose seeds weed

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, or Argyreia nervosa, is a perennial climbing vine native to India, Hawaii and Africa. The seeds of the plant contain a naturally occurring tryptamine called LSA (or Lysergic Acid Amide), which is closely related to LSD. LSA is a compound that may induce sensations of euphoria and relaxation.

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Hawaiian Baby Woodrose

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose, or Argyreia nervosa, is a perennial climbing vine native to India, Hawaii and Africa. The seeds of the plant contain a naturally occurring tryptamine called LSA (or Lysergic Acid Amide), which is closely related to LSD. LSA is a compound that may induce sensations of euphoria and relaxation.

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Hawaiian Baby Woodrose: Seeds containing LSA, similar to LSD

Hawaiian Baby Woodrose has long been used in spiritual celebrations in its native India. Users consume it to achieve feelings of well-being, euphoria and spirituality. Some people use it to induce sweating and to relieve pain. The experience is sometimes described as a milder version of what happens after consuming either LSD or cannabis. The hallucinatory effects of HBW are also described as similar to alcohol intoxication, with experiences of enhanced colours. Effects last between 6-8 hours.

The maximum safe dose is about 2 grams. Do not exceed the recommended dosage. Side effects may include nausea, blurred vision and vertigo.

All You Should Know About Hawaiian Baby Woodrose

Hawaiian baby woodrose is one of many entheogenic plants that have been used throughout human history to produce mind-altering experiences. The active substance in the seeds is LSA, a close molecular cousin to LSD.

Hawaiian baby woodrose Category: Psychedlics

Also called: argyreia nervosa, lysergamide, elephant creeper, trip C, purple ohms, trip, E, happy caps, dionysus, BC2.

How it’s used

Hawaiian baby woodrose is a climbing vine with large furry seeds which grow in pods. The seeds are light brown or tan in colour and contain a powerful hallucinogen LSA (lysergic acid amide), similar to LSD. You can be swallow them whole or crush them and mix with hot water to make a tea. These seeds have long been used in religious ceremonies in Hawaii and parts of South America.

Short-term effects

  • Effects begin after an hour and typically last for 4-8 hours
  • Your perceptions of time, sounds and vision change
  • Euphoria – extreme happiness
  • Extreme tiredness

Long-term effects

  • Flashbacks
  • You risk psychological disturbance if you use heavily
  • Indifference and apathy
  • Decreased psychomotor activity
  • You may feel like you’re sinking into nothingness
  • Tiredness, desire to sleep
  • Feelings of unreality

Other dangers

Overdose of Hawaiian baby woodrose may cause a psychotic episode

If you are pregnant

Do not use Hawaiian baby woodrose if you are pregnant as it can cause uterine contractions, so you could lose your baby.

Addictive

You can’t become physically addicted and there is a very low risk of psychological dependency.

Withdrawal

No withdrawal symptoms

How long does it stay in your system?

No urine test for this yet

What help is available?

  • Self-help support such as Narcotics Anonymous
  • Counselling or psychotherapy
  • Complementary therapies, such as acupuncture
  • Support from your doctor
  • Residential treatment programmes (clinics)
  • Aftercare
  • One to one or group family support
  • Contact the Drugs Helpline 1800 459 459 to find out about options in your area

The HSE and Union of Students in Ireland (USI) ask students to think about drug safety measures when using club drugs

Two cases of lysergamide intoxication by ingestion of seeds from Hawaiian Baby Woodrose

We describe two cases of human consumption of seeds from Argyreia nervosa (Hawaiian Baby Woodrose), which resulted in one fatality due to falling from a building and one surviving witness. The principal psychoactive constituent of the seeds, lysergamide (LSA), was recovered from blood and urine samples by mixed-mode cation exchange solid-phase extraction and quantified by ultra performance liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ToF/MS). The LSA concentrations were determined by UPLC-ToF/MS to be 4.9 microg/L in blood and 1.0mg/L in urine in the dead person and 1.8 microg/L in blood and 0.50mg/L in urine in the living person. These analytical findings were found to be in accordance with the case story, which indicated that seeds had been ingested and also noted psychological reactions, i.e. the will to jump out of the window. Other findings in the dead person were 22 microg/L THC in blood, 0.71 g/L ethanol in blood and 1.0 g/L ethanol in vitreous humor. Constituents originating from the seeds of A. nervosa, i.e. LSA, ergonovine, lysergic acid alpha-hydroxyethylamide were also identified in the biological samples. The 2-hydroxy-3-oxo metabolites of LSA and ergonovine were identified in the urine sample of the deceased.

Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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