Goat weed plant seeds

Goat’s Weed Pepper Seeds

Goat’s Weed peppers grow straight up from the olive green leaves and stems that are lined with silver hair. The peppers have a beautiful aging color pattern as they start off green, turn black, and eventually ripen to a rich red color once they reach about 3 inches in length. All three colors can be well presented on the plant at any time, along with beautiful white flowers.

Goat’s Weed peppers average about 20,000 to 40,000 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), similar to the Black Pearl pepper, NuMex Twilight pepper, and Pequin pepper. The heat level of Goat’s Weed peppers is between the Serrano and Cayenne. One of the most beautiful ornamental peppers, the Goat’s Weed pepper is the perfect combination of beauty and spice. Goat’s Weed peppers are commonly dried and used in a flake or powder form. Its appearance is strikingly similar to the Black Cobra pepper.

4 Reviews Hide Reviews Show Reviews
Happy w/ purchase

Posted by Lynn on 11th May 2018

This was a very pleasant transaction and I am happy with my seats thank you

easy to grow, beautiful hot peppers

Posted by Unknown on 23rd Feb 2018

im a big fan of the ornamental peppers that are also slightly spicy and i found the perfect match with the goat's weed pepper. these plants are great. thanks guys. i had no problem getting the seeds started and i cant wait for more peppers.

just as described

Posted by linda on 8th Aug 2017

fresh seeds that grew into yummy ornamental peppers, love how they look on my patio

great buy

Posted by Unknown on 29th Jul 2017

My seeds arrived fast and they were easy to germinate. Can't beat the price either!

Goat weed plant seeds

An exotic hot pepper variety having 3″ long fruits that ripen from green to black to red and have a fairly hot flavor. The fruits remain at the black stage for a number of weeks providing an exotic and ornamental look to the plant. In addition, stems and leaves are covered in silvery hairs. Plants show tall, upright growth up to 3-5 feet. The variety is also known to overwinter quite well in relatively frost free climates.

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Seed Availability

Seeds are now available at our seed store.

Days to Maturity

Heat Level

Origin

Originally from Venezuela.

Germination Info

Start seeds in small containers from 8-10 weeks prior to the last frost date. Plant seeds approximately 1/4-1/2″ deep in moist, well drained potting soil. Most standard soil mixes are suitable for pepper seeds. Soil temperature must be kept at 75-90F for proper germination. Cool soil, particularly at night can inhibit or significantly delay germination. To keep soil temperature warm, start seeds indoors, in a greenhouse and/or use a seed starting heat mat. Keep soil moderately moist, though not overly, dripping wet. Water soil when the soil surface just begins to dry. Allow proper air circulation for containers.

Optionally, seeds can be dipped in a dilute hydrogen peroxide mix (1 tsp hydrogen peroxide per cup water) for one minute to disinfect seeds prior to planting. If your soil or seed sprouting setup is susceptible to mold growth this can be useful to kill mold spores.

Once seedlings have sprouted, keep in small containers until a few sets of leaves have developed. Transplant to larger containers or outdoors. If transplanting outdoors, make sure to harden off seedlings by exposing them to only filtered sunlight for up to 1-2 weeks. Thin plants to 3-4 ft and rows to 6-10 ft.

Estimated germination time under optimal conditions: 2-6 weeks

Additional Pictures

Related Species

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Goatweed Control in Pastures and Hayfields

Goatweed (Figure 1), also known as sweet broom (Scoparia dulcis) has been a problem in Florida pastures and hayfields for many years. Dense infestations of goatweed are quite common throughout the state. In most cases where goatweed density is extremely high, the pasture has been disturbed, overgrazed or sod has been lifted. In addition limited forage growth due to decreased daylength and environmental conditions during the winter months results in an increase in goatweed density .

Goatweed is considered an annual weed, but it can also be considered a perennial in South Florida. Plants can grow at least 36 inches tall, with leaves 0.5 to 3 inches long on short petioles. Each goatweed plant is capable of producing thousands of seeds that are approximately 0.25 mm in diameter that can be spread by wind, water, and equipment. In North Florida, this weed flowers and sets seeds many times until frost. In South Florida, it appears that flowering and fruiting can occur year-round.

A study was conducted at the University of Florida in the mid 1980s that investigated goatweed seed germination. The authors found that goatweed seeds do not germinate under dark conditions. This means that there must be at least some light for germination to occur. In fact, as little at 6 hours of light resulted in approximately 18% germination, with maximum germination occurring with 9 to 13 hours of light. Therefore, a thick, healthy sward can limit the goatweed seed germination in a pasture.

Proper pasture management can go a long way in controlling this weed, especially if you consider that this plant can tolerate 2 lb/acre of glyphosate quite well. To date, the only sure-fire herbicide for goatweed control in pastures is metsulfuron at 0.3 oz/acre, which is a problem for producers who graze bahiagrass as metsulfuron has the potential to severely injure ‘Pensacola’ type bahiagrass. For bahiagrass, 2 qt/acre of 2,4-D or a tank-mix of GrazonNext HL at 24 oz + 1.5 qt/acre 2,4-D will be needed for satisfactory control. However, complete control in bahiagrass is rarely achieved with one application. In bermudagrass and stargrass, combining these two herbicides (2,4-D and metsuluron) is an option and the rate of 2,4-D could be lowered to 1 qt/acre. In limpograss pastures or hayfields metsulfuron at 0.3 oz/acre or Chaparral at 3.0 oz/acre has provided consistent control.

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