Do weed seeds give you headaches

What Happens When You Smoke Cannabis Seeds?

As medical researchers endeavor to uncover additional health benefits of cannabis, users are also coming up with more creative ways to consume weed. You may have come across oil tinctures made from cannabis extracts like cannabidiol (CBD), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), or cannabigerol (CBG).

Besides oral tinctures, other cannabis-based products include cannabis edible products like gummy bears, cannabis-infused vape juices, cannabis-enriched cosmetic and skincare products, as well as cannabis- formulated pills and tablets. And if you’re not opposed to the idea of smoking, you might even try smoking dried cannabis extracts like flowers, buds, and leaves. But what of cannabis seeds? Is it possible to smoke cannabis seeds, and what could happen?

This article shall shed more light on that.

Which Cannabis Plants Produce Seeds?

Before you purchase marijuana seeds from a cannabis seedbank, it’s essential to understand where these seeds come from in the first place. That knowledge will help you to determine whether you should go ahead and smoke the seeds or not. Like many plants, cannabis plants come in male and female, and hermaphrodite varieties. Female cannabis plants play the most crucial role during the germination process, as much of the plant’s extract comes from them.

On the other hand, male cannabis plants are mostly known for their ability to produce pollen grains. Generally, experts recommend discarding male cannabis plants from a marijuana farm. That’s because their pollen might pollinate the female plants and, in the process, cause a small number of cannabis seeds in female marijuana’s colas.

A cannabis cola simply refers to the central flower cluster that usually forms on the uppermost portion of the larger branches in a mature marijuana plant.

As you weed out male cannabis seeds from your farm, you should also do the same to hermaphrodite plants.

Hermaphrodites are plants that contain both male and female reproductive parts on the same tree.

The female reproductive parts in a hermaphrodite cannabis plant are not an issue at all. The problem lies with the male parts, which might cause unwanted pollination. By and large, you should avoid smoking cannabis seeds, particularly seeds found within cannabis nugs.

Cannabis nugs (short form for nuggets) refer to the colas’ smokable parts, or simply the bud material.

As we’ve already highlighted, cannabis seeds are formed in the nugs during pollination. Researchers have established that consuming marijuana seeds along with the nuggets, might trigger headaches. Now, that might get you wondering, can you then consume cannabis seeds that are not part of weed nuggets? Well, these seeds are not recommended either. Besides causing headaches, the seeds might also trigger a host of mental and physical discomfort.

nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. The following are other common risks associated with smoking cannabis seeds;

I. Toxicity from heavy metals

One great thing about cannabis plants is that they don’t contain toxic compounds. That explains why many users who experience adverse effects often report mild and short-lasting side effects than many other herbal extracts. However, the equation suddenly changes when it comes to smoking, and worse yet, when smoking marijuana seeds.

Smoking requires combustion, which implies that there are high-temperature conditions involved. The elevated temperatures could oxidize some of the toxic compounds in the air, including heavy metals like mercury and carcinogenic compounds like benzopyrene and benzanthracene.

Once oxidized, these compounds combine with the seeds and are inhaled along with the smoke produced. Long-term smoking (of cannabis seeds and any other parts of the plant) could increase your risks of developing chronic illnesses like lung cancer and heart disease.

online smoke shop will sell you the right stuff, not the seeds

How Do You Avoid Cannabis Seeds?

The best way to avoid cannabis seeds is to desist from buying marijuana products from the black market, especially if you’re purchasing raw, unprocessed extracts like buds and flowers. Instead, insist on reputable cannabis traders.

If you’re a cannabis grower and don’t want your seeds to waste, you can consider composting them. You might also ground the seeds and add the powder to various food products like tea or butter. There’s also the option of making marijuana liqueur, where you place the seeds inside a liqueur containing an alcohol percentage of at least 40%. You then allow the mixture to sit for a week for any THC present in the seeds to transfer to the liqueur. Whatever you do, just ensure you don’t smoke the seeds.

Why Does Your Head Hurt After You Smoke Weed?

We’ve likely all heard of some of the side effects that are possible when smoking marijuana. What is less talked about, however, are some of the milder symptoms that occur from periodic cannabis consumption.

While there is minimal evidence currently available on the matter, many cannabis users report headaches after smoking weed. Is it possible for the two to be connected in a physiological sense?

In this article, we take a look at the facts in order to try and answer this question. Can cannabis cause headaches, or are other factors at play? Here is all you need to know and more.

The Weed Hangover

If you have ever smoked a little more than you should have, you will probably understand exactly what we mean by the term ‘weed hangover.’ For those who are less in the know, let us explain.

Most of us have been there; a quiet night in with a few drinks turns into an over-indulgent party full of fun and far too much alcohol. You wake up the next day feeling miserable, with a terrible headache after smoking weed and an intense nausea from the alcohol.

Sound familiar? Well, there are many cannabis users out there that claim marijuana can do the same thing in terms of resulting in a wicked headache.
While not scientifically proven, many marijuana enthusiasts report telltale symptoms of a hangover the day after a heavy smoking session. And yes – along with things like fatigue, dry eyes, brain fog, and nausea, severe headaches are a common side effect that one might experience after heavy use.

In a general sense, we now know from years of research that cannabis is a non-toxic plant. Unlike alcohol, which can be extremely dangerous (and even lethal in high doses), there has never been a reported case of overdose or death by consuming cannabis.

Thus, even if these mythical weed hangovers were a real physiological thing, they would not compare in intensity to the hangover that results from drinking too much alcohol. Furthermore, even if we could objectively define the symptoms that result from a weed hangover, the effects would likely be greatly diluted in comparison to the physiological effects that excess alcohol has on the body.

But, is it possible that weed does, in fact, cause a migraine? Or, to a less severe extent, does it make physiological sense to get a headache after weed? Let’s dig a little deeper.

Weed Headaches: The Myth Behind Cannabis and Dehydration

It’s well-known that one of the critical causes of headaches is dehydration. But is dehydration a result of cannabis?

The evidence on cannabis usage and dehydration is inconclusive and warrants further study. Many people attribute dry mouth, or ‘cotton mouth’ to dehydration, but this is inaccurate. Studies have shown that actually, cottonmouth has to do with lack of saliva and the way that cannabis interacts with the body – namely the CB1 and CB2 receptors of the endocannabinoid system.

With that in mind, what else is there to explore when it comes to marijuana and headaches (informally known as a weed headache)?

The Facts About Cannabis and Headaches

Among the misinformed claims that cannabis can bring about a killer headache, are the many studies done on marijuana as an effective treatment for headaches and migraines.

A study published as recently as 2016 showed that across 121 adult migraine sufferers, the occurrence of migraines was more than halved after the consumption of cannabis. In another study from 2017, authors observed that patients reported fewer migraines per month after cannabis use.

Here are some of the published statistics from the studies:

  • The average number of migraines reduced from 10.4 per month to 4.6
  • Approximately 85% of the participants reported having fewer migraines per month using marijuana
  • Only 12% of the 121 participants stated they saw no change in the frequency of their migraines

Researchers from the 2016 publication in Pharmacotherapy (see link above) remarked that “most patients used more than one form of marijuana, and used it daily for [the] prevention of migraine headache.” They also concluded that “inhaled forms of marijuana were commonly used for acute migraine treatment, and were reported to abort migraine headache.”

What Can You Do to Combat a Headache Caused by Weed?

While there is no evidence for the argument that cannabis itself brings about headaches, it is possible that other factors related to smoking marijuana can contribute. Whether you are out in the sunshine enjoying cannabis with your friends or having a heavy smoking session inside, there are a few aspects to consider if you suffer from “after weed” headaches.

If you are going to be smoking outside enjoying the summer, remember to drink plenty of water before, during, and after smoking. While there may not be evidence of cannabis causing headaches, there is plenty of scientific evidence for the sun causing dehydration, which we know brings on headaches. Keeping on top of your fluid intake and giving yourself breaks in the shade should help to combat those pesky brain pains.

The same rule is applicable if you are getting high indoors, as it can be so easy to forget to drink! Keeping water next to you will serve as a visual reminder for those occasions where you are too intoxicated to otherwise remember to hydrate.

There are of course a few other tips and tricks, such as avoiding salty foods (which may be easier said than done once the munchies kick in!), and ensuring that you don’t overdo it.

In any case, it should be fairly clear by now that cannabis itself is not the main reason for those ‘weed hangover’ symptoms – headaches included.

Final Thoughts on Marijuana and Headaches

To summarize, the answer to the question of “why does my head hurt when I smoke weed” doesn’t necessarily involve cannabis. Headaches can occur as the result of a number of different things, but too much cannabis is not likely one of them.

Using common sense when enjoying marijuana will usually be enough to see off any headaches. Perhaps a particular strain doesn’t agree with you, or maybe you simply haven’t had enough to drink that day.

What we do know is that marijuana does not cause dehydration. Furthermore, it is not conclusive that a headache after weed is caused by the cannabis itself. So for those who are concerned about headaches after smoking a joint, perhaps consider what other factors might be at play!