Can hydro weed have seeds

5 differences between hydro and bush weed

We’ve put together a list of the five main differences.

Illegal Australian weed tends to be produced domestically using two main growing methods known as hydro or bush weed . You’ve probably heard both of these terms before, but what exactly is the difference between the two? We’ve put together a list of the five main differences.

1. Hydro is grown indoors, bush is grown outdoors

Hydro is cannabis which is grown indoors using a hydroponic system that involves round the clock electric lighting, as well as pumping water and nutrient-rich solutions into the cannabis plant. While it is typically without soil this is not always the case.

Bush weed is cannabis grown outdoors.

Despite differences in growing technique, both hydro and bush weed cost the same at around $20 per gram . Both typically use the same seed stock, with a range of pesticides, and fertilisers used to promote cannabis plant growth and prevent insect damage. Therefore, any weed sold on the street claiming to be organic bush should be met with a healthy level of scepticism.

2. Hydro is more commonly used than bush weed

In Australia, hydro is the most widely used form of cannabis. This could be for a number of reasons, for example hydroponic systems could be considered easier to hide from police as they are indoors. For more information, see our research paper: tackling cannabis markets in residential settings.

Hydro cannabis is shielded from extreme weather events throughout the seasons, and plants can be grown the whole year round, with 24-hour exposure to light. This results in a much higher yield, which could explain why there is so much more of it about.,

3. Users say hydro and bush have completely different textures

According to a study conducted by NCPIC and the Australian Institute of Criminology, people interviewed generally believe indoor hydroponic marijuana is stickier, denser, more compact and contains more crystals , than cannabis which is grown outdoors. Crystals are the resinous trichomes usually found on the flowering head and surrounding leaves of the cannabis plant, which contain high levels of cannabinoids.

In contrast, bush weed is believed to be drier and fluffier in texture than hydro. As set out below, this is not supported by potency studies of cannabis of known provenance.

4. Most people believe hydro has a more powerful smell than bush

The same NCPIC study also found 74 per cent of those interviewed believe hydro has a more distinct odour than bush. People often describe the smell as stronger, more pungent with sometimes more of a chemical smell, but this is all subjective and likely to be influenced by marketing and expectations.

5. People believe hydro gives a much stronger high than bush weed

While reports from cannabis users responding to surveys find most believe hydro is more potent that bush weed, this is not supported by scientific analysis. While it is a pretty common perception, it s at odds with a study conducted in 2013 which compared the strength of cannabis grown indoors and outdoors. The study actually couldn t find any significant difference in THC levels of 26 difference samples from crops seized by NSW police across the state.

For more information about cannabis and potency, check out our factsheet .

Cannabis is produced, distributed and consumed in many different ways around the world. As is often the case, there is a lot of room for more research around the differences between hydro and bush weed in Australia and overseas.

Both hydro and bush weed can have a negative impact on your health. Use from a young age particularly, has been linked with mental health issues, and smoking anything is bad for your lungs. So remember, just because someone says their weed is grown outdoors or under strictly controlled conditions, doesn’t necessarily mean it is better for you

I have an indoor growroom and in my recent harvest I found seeds in the buds, but I’m sure there are no male plants in the room. I’ve heard that light leakage can cause plants to become hermaphrodites. Is this true, and if so, do you have any tips for avoiding this?

Cannabis plants are monecious. This means they have the ability to be either male or female. Or in the case of hermaphroditism, they can be both. The reason to make sure there are no males or hermaphrodites in your garden is because male flowers make pollen. When pollen touches the white hairs on a flower, it makes a seed, and seeded weed gives you headaches. Even though there are reasons in nature hermaphroditism could be important, such as continuing the species in case there is no male present, hermaphroditism is generally a bad thing when talking about cannabis plants.

Light poisoning is the most common cause for a normal plant to hermaphrodite.

Light poisoning refers to the flowering night cycle of a plant being unnaturally interrupted with light. The best way to prevent this is to close yourself inside your darkened room during the daylight, and then after allowing a few minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark, check for any light leaks from covered windows, door jams, etc. Also cover all timer and appliance lights with tape.

Negative stressors can combine with small interruptions of the light cycle to cause hermaphroditism, especially with less-stable, clone-only hybridized strains. When the night cycle is abnormally interrupted, it sends a mixed hormonal signal to the plant. This can cause a full female plant to throw some male flowers. Male flowers are easy to identify, especially when side by side with female flowers. Male flowers look like small bunches of bananas, which will take a week or two to swell before they burst and release their pollen.

Read also:

Finding a hermaphrodite in your growroom can happen at any stage of the flowering cycle and is indicated by the presence of male flowers growing on the same plant as female flowers. As with all species in nature this can occur in varying degrees. A plant can become slightly or majorly hermaphroditic. In cases where singular male flowers are found between the branch and stalk nodes, you should be diligently removing them as they grow. You must re-inspect the plant top to bottom every few days to be sure pollination and seeding doesn’t occur. If you find male flowers (anthers) actually growing from within the female flowers (buds) the situation is a little more dire. You can still remove all the male anatomy as it appears, but it will be harder to find and much more prevalent. This is a horrible discovery that leads to a tough decision: Should you let the plant live and risk the whole crop being ruined by seeds?

In either case, once hermaphroditism has compromised the safety and purity of your sensimilla, the plant should not be propagated further. Remember, once a hermy, always a hermy. The plant pictured here is in the tenth and what should have been the final week of ripening, but a timer failed and one light stayed on continuously for almost two weeks, causing this vegetative regrowth. Because the light was continuous, the plant made no pollen. This method of re-vegging can be used to save a flowering plant you have no copies of, but be careful, as this may cause some strains to hermaphrodite.

Purposefully causing a plant to hermaphrodite is called selfing. Gibberellic acid or colloidal silver is typically sprayed onto the female plant. This technique is used to make feminized seeds and uses the plant’s ability to be both male and female to force a female plant to produce male flowers. The pollen contained in these male flowers can only produce female seeds. Just keep in mind that feminized plants should not be used for breeding, as they were produced without a true male, making them genetically inferior.