Betty hayes seeds

HANNAH ELIZABETH “BETTY” HAYES

Services are 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 9, in Cantlon Otterness Funeral Chapel with the Rev. Terry Gentry Jr. officiating. Burial is in Olive Point Cemetery under the direction of Cantlon Otterness Funeral Home of Urbana.

Visitation is 1 to 2 p.m. prior to service time at the funeral home.

Escorts are Richard Johnson, Gary Taber, Josh Taylor, Kevin Frerking and Shero Alloush.

Hannah Elizabeth “Betty” Hayes was born July 5, 1917, the daughter of Nathaniel Marvin and Lou Sinda (Hyde) Maddux. She died Aug. 6, 2008, at Citizens Memorial Healthcare, Bolivar, at the age of 91 years, 1 month and 1 day.

She was reared in the Tunas and Urbana areas and graduated from Urbana High School.

She was united in marriage with Howard Hayes on Dec. 24, 1934, and to this union two daughters were born.

They made their home on a farm north of Urbana except for a short time they spent in California in the late 1930s.

She worked at Skyline High School for 12 years, retiring as head cook. She helped build and then managed the senior center in Urbana for 20 years.

She worked outside of the home for many years, but her true love in life was working on the farm. She raised her own chickens and butchered them and was noted for her fried chicken as well as her apple salad and poppy seed dressing.

She was also a nature lover and loved watching birds. Most of all she was mom and grandma; her children and grandchildren were the love of her life.

She had a true love of God and was a lifelong member of the Olive Point Baptist Church where she attended as long as her health permitted.

She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Howard; and two brothers: George and Bill Maddux.

Survivors include her daughters: Dorothy Taylor, Urbana, and Mary Younger, Buffalo; her brother, Ed Maddux, Tunas; her sisters: Edna Manasaro, Tunas, and Mary Maxine Graf, Lafayette, La.; her grandchildren: Sue and husband, Richard Johnson, Bill and wife, Rebecca Younger, Cindy and husband, Gary Tabor, and Josh Taylor; her great-grandchildren: Stephanie Alloush, Shelly Stanton and Stuart Stanton Jr.; and her great-great-grandchildren: Tayler Hoyle, Peyton Hoyle and Dominick Stanton; her nieces and nephews; and other family and many friends who will all truly miss her.

The Cloud Mountain Farm Center Team

I was raised in research grain fields and greenhouses in the Willamette Valley, and have worked in food and farm systems in the Pacific Northwest for over a decade. My introduction to the Whatcom farm landscape was as a Political Science undergrad at Western Washington, where I worked with rural youth in food justice and land access. I professionalized my love of plants and soils with a B.S. in Crop Science/Agronomy from Oregon State, and have worked with just about everything you can grow in the northwest—fat lambs, cereal crops, seed crops, orchards, vineyards, you name it. My favorite part of working at CMFC is the staff; second favorite is getting to the Shipova and Peach Plums in the orchard first when they ripen. Outside of work I’m constantly flanked by three to four bad dogs who love mud and mischief and keep me exploring mountains, logging roads, rivers, or wherever weekends take us.

Hilary Graham

I started in the intern program way back in 2013 and have held various positions around the farm since. During my time at CMFC I also co-owned Small Acres Farm for 4 years growing fruits, veggies, goats, and experience. In 2017 my husband and I moved to the South Fork Valley and started Monkey Puzzle Farm. We grow certified organic contract wholesale vegetable and flower seeds for organic seed companies. We have a smattering of fruit trees, shrubs, canes and vines- and goats to keep us and our growing family eating happily and well. I love working with a diversity of plants that show me new things every day.

Tim Poole

I became our Operations & Facilities Coordinator in October of 2016, after completing a season as a nursery-specific intern; I have been Operations & Facilities Manager since 2020. Previously, I worked as a laboratory and field research assistant for the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Wisconsin Madison Peninsular Agricultural Research Station. Interns and incubators are my favorite aspect of working at CMFC; their enthusiasm and curiosity is contagious. The motivating energy radiating from fresh hands and minds is always worth the investment. I would rather be eating Mexican food while practicing Shinrin-yoku under the Oaks and Beeches of Washington Island, Wisconsin. My favorite thing to grow is a mustache.

Jacob Mills

I grew up in Northwest Indiana and discovered a love for agriculture while studying Sustainable Food Systems at Indiana University Bloomington. A desire to escape the harsh Midwestern winters that kept me from doing farm work year-round brought me to the Pacific Northwest in early 2020. My experience prior to Cloud Mountain Farm Center is in annual vegetable farming on a variety of scales ranging from 1 to 25 acres. My love for growing food sustainably is constantly reinforced by observing the diverse forms (insect and beyond) of life that show up on, in (for better or worse) and around the food I grow with my coworkers. Growing fruit is new to me but as an avid consumer of fruit I am eagerly awaiting my first harvest at Cloud Mountain. On and off farm I love being outside, rain or shine, and listening to podcasts and audiobooks about politics, philosophy and the paranormal. My partner and I live in Bellingham and spend most of our time walking our dog, eating and playing video games.

Maia Binhammer

I started working here at Cloud Mountain in 2020 as an apprentice, after having previously farmed in Pennsylvania. While I’ve been farming for a handful of years now, I’ve been an avid fruit enthusiast since I was old enough to pluck a wild strawberry from the lawn. I have a particular passion for unique and obscure fruit varietals, and enjoy getting to share all of the fruits of our labors here at the farm with the surrounding Bellingham and greater Western, WA community. When I’m not in the fields pruning/picking/packing/cultivating, you might find me hiking, out with my camera, or enjoying a local Whatcom-brewed beer.

Emily Erickson

I like to think that my love of plants was inherited from my grandma Jean. My respect for the natural world comes from my dad. I’m constantly seeking to balance the wild and the cultivated in my own gardening and farming adventures. After a long day working with the trees and vines of Cloud Mountain, I drive up the hill to my home in Maple Falls and continue working the land. My partner and I are building a house and small farm from the ground up. The to-do list is never-ending, but nothing beats the satisfaction of seeing the dream become reality. When I’m not tending plants, I enjoy making up recipes in the kitchen, paddleboarding in the summer, skiing at Mt. Baker in the winter, and cuddling up with my cats just about any time of the year.

Terry Maczuga

I have formal training and experience as a teacher, life experience in both home and commercial orchards, and a lifelong passion for plants and gardening. I feel the most rewarding part of my job is educating people about perennial plants- what works where, how to grow both food for the family and plantings for the environment and for aesthetic and mental health. I’ve built a house, not knowing anything about construction. Almost four decades later, I still live in that house. I love trying to grow alpine plants, especially ones that are native to the North Cascades. Like most rock garden enthusiasts, it’s a case of “tried that, killed that”.

Edward Johnson

I’ve been living in Bellingham since graduating from WWU with a degree in environmental science. My main passions as a student were working at the Outback Farm as the Permaculture Assistant Coordinator and studying terrestrial ecology. As an intern with Skagit Fisheries Enhancement Group, I monitored riparian habitat restoration and helped run a native plant nursery. I also enjoy meteorology, gardening, and being outdoors. My favorite fruits are figs and quince! My goals are to engage people with perennial food systems, to learn as much as I can about plants, and maintain the beautiful landscape at CMFC.

Hanna Wolff

My love of food systems and sustainable agriculture blossomed in 2017 while working and living on an ecological farm abroad. I became engrossed in all things farming and permaculture. I spent two formidable years on that farm, planting seeds and watching them and myself flourish and grow.

I later found myself back in the states working in outdoor education and living in Portland, OR., then the pandemic hit. With life as we knew it shifting and shutting down, my partner and I headed up to Whatcom County for what was meant to be a quick weekend getaway and the rest is history. I found my way back into working with plants here at Cloud Mountain at the start of the 2021 season.

When I’m not at work, I’m typically hiking with my dogs, listening to music, or finding too many cool rocks along the river.

George Kaas

Having grown up in a farming community in the California central valley, I rebelled and studied ornamental Horticulture and landscape design. I worked in construction and taught at Bellingham Technical College and finished a Masters in Ag production focused on soils and plant pathology from Cal-Poly, San Luis Obispo. I also wrote a gardening column in the Bellingham Herald for a couple of decades and retired from teaching Agriculture and Science at Blaine High School. I enjoy the community interaction and education provided here at Cloud Mountain. The goal here has always been to help people be successful in growing fruit and beautiful gardens. I am stoked to be a member of this team. When not here at Cloud Mountain, I am always somewhere else!

Rachel Wood

I grew up bopping around my dad and grandpa’s gardens, canoeing in the Boundary Waters, and enjoying as much time exploring the great Minnesotan outdoors as I could. After taking a gap year to farm in Pennsylvania, I realized my passion for sustainable agriculture, natural resources, and community development. I graduated from the University of Minnesota with a B.S. in Food Systems and have lived in Bellingham for the past three years. I’ve worked for a handful of agricultural nonprofits supporting small farm businesses and recently finished two years in the Washington Conservation Corps. I hope to get to know even more about fruit trees, perennials, and the community working in Cloud Mountain’s nursery. In my free time, I enjoy camping, board games, trivia, and bopping around my own garden at home.

Lynette Machinksi

I’ve always loved to dig in the dirt and so I earned my B.A. in Environmental Science from the University of Virginia. But I took a little detour and flew planes for the Navy after college. I’ve recently retired from the Navy Reserve and am now returning to my roots and loving getting my hands in the soil and learning all I can about plants! When I’m not at Cloud Mountain I enjoy trail running, hiking and camping with my family. And seeing what I can grow and eat from my 96 square foot sidewalk garden.

Curtis Pritz

I currently live in Bellingham Washington but I moved here from Arizona 5 years ago. I have recently graduated from Bellingham Technical College with my culinary degree and I have been cooking in a few places around town. I am interested in the internship because I feel that people in general are extremely disconnected with their food and where it comes from. I wanted to get an understanding of how food is grown so not only can I teach people and chefs, but run a restaurant on a fully functioning organic farm. Most of my time and brainpower goes to food, but other than that I enjoy being outside. I like to fish, hike, camp or even a bon fire in a back yard just to be outside.

In 2019, we merged with Sustainable Connections to maximize our impact in the community. Meet the rest of our incredible Bellingham-based team here and learn about our board of directors.

Farm Founders

Cloud Mountain Farm Center was started in 1978 as Cloud Mountain Farm. For over thirty years, Tom and Cheryl Thornton dedicated themselves to building a diverse, accessible, and inspiring farm–their legacy is one of outreach, innovation, creativity, and hard work. While the Thorntons retired from farm center operations in 2022, they both continue to be active in grower support, farm to school advocacy, and in the rural Whatcom county community.

Tom Thornton

I have spent 40 years as a student in annual and perennial cropping systems. I that time I have also attended countless agricultural workshops across the country. It’s been very satisfying to share the valuable lessons I have learned in crop production and in running a small business with the next generation of farmers who participate in our educational programs. I never get tired of the journey you must take every year through the seasons to grow successful perennial crops. I enjoy making wine, listening to music and spending time with family. My favorite thing to grow changed every year. Peaches have been the favorite for a while now, because they are the true local crop. When you pick them at their best they don’t ship very far. Peach plum is an obscure plum we’ve grown for 30 years, it will make you smile every time!

Cheryl Thornton

Founder
I have worked in the agricultural field and food system world for over 37 years. My work has ranged from business owner to educator to marketer and financial manager. My favorite part of the work here is building relationships between different sectors of the community with an agricultural focus. Community building through education and providing products grown here at the farm is my main passion. I farmed in Norway for 2 years and learned about small agricultural communities and the role that agriculture plays in those communities. I also worked in the Alaskan Arctic and also learned about how natural resources plays such a vital role in peoples’ lives there. My favorite thing to grow is flowering perennials and an assortment of vegetables in a home garden.