Angelica seeds

Angelica, Official (Angelica archangelica) seeds, organic

Biennial native to temperate Europe, Siberia and the Himalayan Mountains. Cultivated worldwide. Traditional usage (TWM): Bitter aromatic, antimicrobial and carminative. Flowers green-yellow in the second year to a height of 3 feet. Plant prefers full sun to part shade and moist soil. Cold stored seed. Short-lived seed. Press these light dependent germinators into surface of soil and keep cool and moist. A bit slow to start at first, but then fast growing. Space plants 2 to 3 feet apart.

Packet contains 50 seeds
5 g contains ~1,000 seeds
10 g contains ~2,000 seeds

Certified Organically Grown

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What others are saying

Cena Ewert – July 17, 2020

I am so excited my Angelica is coming up! And growing fast now.

logan5446 (verified owner) – February 12, 2020

If you want to actually grow angelica, get your seeds here. If you want something to compost into your soil, due to lack of viability, go elsewhere. The smell (the 2nd season) of the flowers is like a floral approximation of honey. Very beautiful and pervasive, even though the flowers themselves are unassuming. The roots (prior to flowering) are fantastic, at least in my experience, for upper respiratory infections. Indispensable for distillers of fine spirits and certainly has a place in regular old brewing as well. For ease of harvest, try using 5+ gal smart pots. (though I have seen one happy in a smaller container too) A bit finicky about transplanting.

blick002 – January 12, 2020

Good germination indoors and transplant survival into average garden soil. Survived two zone 3 winters and are the first up in the herb garden each spring. They also reseeded after flowering their second year…a nice surprise!

Angelica Seeds

Sowing: To break its dormancy this seed needs a period of cold moisture, a period of warm moisture, followed by another period of cold moisture. Mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 60 days, then move it to a 70-75 degrees F location for 30-60 days, followed by another 30-60 day period in the refrigerator before planting. To accomplish this naturally, simply plant the seed in late fall and wait until the second spring after planting for germination.To start the treated seed indoors, plant Angelica seeds in trays just under the surface of the soil, since they need light to germinate. The germination rate of this seed is naturally low, and the seeds will be slow to sprout. The seedlings should be transplanted while they are small, since larger plants do not tolerate transplanting well.

Growing: This plant grows best in full sun or dappled shade and moist soil, preferably near water. It reaches its full size in its second year of growth, and often doesn’t bloom until its third year. Though the foliage dies back in winter, it survives cold weather well. If grown for its roots, the quality and size will be improved by pruning off the flower heads; this also lengthens the life of the plant, since it dies after producing seed. This plant reproduces itself by side shoots, but does not spread aggressively. Angelica attracts butterflies, especially the short-tailed swallowtail.

Harvesting: All parts of angelica plant are edible, and can be used for culinary or medicinal purposes.The roots are at their best in the autumn of the first year, while the stems and leaves are at their best in the spring of the second year. The seeds can be used when they have ripened. When harvesting angelica in the wild, keep in mind that it strongly resembles water hemlock, a very deadly poisonous plant.

Seed Saving: The Angelica seeds will turn from green to yellow when mature; remove the seed heads and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. Rub them lightly to separate the seed from the stems. Plant Angelica seeds as soon as possible, or store them in the refrigerator for up to a year.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Purplestem Angelica, Darkpurple Alexanders, Wild Masterwort

Latin Name: Angelica atropurpurea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 5,900

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks, then Warm/Wet for 12 Weeks – Repeat

Germination Ease: Stratify 24 Weeks

Sunlight: Full Sun, Part Sun

Height: 80 Inches

Color: Green

Bloom Season: Blooms Late Spring

Cold scarification

It’s my fault for not buying and sowing these seeds ahead but would be nice if these seed had gone through cold scarification before purchase. Many people don’t know about this requirement and will sow in the spring without cold scarification and get poor or maybe no results.

You are absolutely correct that if they are not planted in the fall, they will need to have their dormancy broken. You will find instructions are on the back of the packet on how to stratify.

DESCRIPTION

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These showy, long-lasting blooms are taller than most other species in a wetland planting. Typically, it towers over the surrounding vegetation and produces the signature globe-like flowers that are hard to miss. The plant also grows in moist woodland areas.

This native wetland plant grows in swampy areas and woodlands, usually near a river or stream. Angelica has a long history of use as a culinary and medicinal herb, since all parts of the plant are edible. When preserved in sugar, the stems make a traditional confection or garnish; both the stems and the seeds are used for making flavoring liqueurs. Many people consider Angelica a vegetable, and eat the celery-like stems raw. In the 15th century Angelica was valued for its medicinal benefits, lauded by many herbalists as a remedy for all ills. Its name comes from the time of the Great Plague in 1665, in a legend that a monk received a cure for the plague from an angel; the cure contained this herb boiled together with molasses and nutmeg, but records do not say whether the mixture had its intended effect. Angelica continues to be associated with protection from evil and disease.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: To break its dormancy this seed needs a period of cold moisture, a period of warm moisture, followed by another period of cold moisture. Mix the seed with moist sand and store it in the refrigerator for 60 days, then move it to a 70-75 degrees F location for 30-60 days, followed by another 30-60 day period in the refrigerator before planting. To accomplish this naturally, simply plant the seed in late fall and wait until the second spring after planting for germination.To start the treated seed indoors, plant Angelica seeds in trays just under the surface of the soil, since they need light to germinate. The germination rate of this seed is naturally low, and the seeds will be slow to sprout. The seedlings should be transplanted while they are small, since larger plants do not tolerate transplanting well.

Growing: This plant grows best in full sun or dappled shade and moist soil, preferably near water. It reaches its full size in its second year of growth, and often doesn’t bloom until its third year. Though the foliage dies back in winter, it survives cold weather well. If grown for its roots, the quality and size will be improved by pruning off the flower heads; this also lengthens the life of the plant, since it dies after producing seed. This plant reproduces itself by side shoots, but does not spread aggressively. Angelica attracts butterflies, especially the short-tailed swallowtail.

Harvesting: All parts of angelica plant are edible, and can be used for culinary or medicinal purposes.The roots are at their best in the autumn of the first year, while the stems and leaves are at their best in the spring of the second year. The seeds can be used when they have ripened. When harvesting angelica in the wild, keep in mind that it strongly resembles water hemlock, a very deadly poisonous plant.

Seed Saving: The Angelica seeds will turn from green to yellow when mature; remove the seed heads and spread them out to dry away from direct sunlight. Rub them lightly to separate the seed from the stems. Plant Angelica seeds as soon as possible, or store them in the refrigerator for up to a year.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: Purplestem Angelica, Darkpurple Alexanders, Wild Masterwort

Latin Name: Angelica atropurpurea

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Perennial

USDA Zones: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

US Regions: Midwest, Northern, Northeast

Seeds per Ounce: 5,900

Stratification: Cold/Wet for 12 Weeks, then Warm/Wet for 12 Weeks – Repeat